Italicize Poems In Essays Do You Italize

When you italicize a word or a phrase, it gets noticed. However, italics (typeface that slants to the right) are a bit understated and do not attract the same attention as say, bold or underline. When to use italics? There are certain style rules to remember. However, italics are popularly used to call attention to certain words in a block of text. When you think about it if all the words looked the same, reading would be a rather boring affair. One thing to remember for any typeface is not to go overboard. If every other word is italics, it loses its effect and becomes less 'special.'

What to Italicize

Like so many rules in the English language, rules for italicization vary. Often italics and underline can be used interchangeably. There are some style guides that prefer the use of underlining over the use of italics (and vice versa).

Here are, though, some rules of what to italicize. However, do keep in mind that for some of these categories below underlining is also possible.

  • Emphasis: When you want to emphasize a certain word or phrase in a sentence. (She was the only girl in the class who got 100% on the exam.)
  • Titles of Works: (Please note that we can also underline the following)
  • Books: (Elements of Style, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Jane Eyre)
  • Magazines: (Time magazine, Newsweek, Cosmpolitan)
  • Newspapers: (USA Today, Wall Street Journal, San Francisco Chronicle)
  • Plays: (Romeo & Juliet, Waiting for Godot, Uncle Vanya)
  • Movies: (Batman, Casablanca, Twilight)
  • Works of Art: (Monet’s Waterlilies, Van Gogh’s Starry Starry Night, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa)
  • TV/radio programs: (American Idol, BBC’s Woman’s Hour, The Simpsons)
  • CD/Album: (Michael Jackson’s Thriller album, Parachutes by Cold Play)
  • Foreign Words/Technical Terms/Unfamiliar Words: When we are writing a text in one particular language (i.e. English) and want to introduce a foreign word or phrase, we tend to italicize the foreign words. (The word for cat in Spanish is gato.)
  • Names of Trains, Ships, Aircraft, and Spacecraft: (NASA’s Challenger, QE2) 

When to Underline

As we have discussed italics and underline can both be used for titles of major works. There are certain style guides that require underlining for titles, such as the MLA.

Example:

I have never seen the movie Titanic.

We have to read two plays by Shakespeare: Hamlet and Macbeth.

Also, sometimes italics can be difficult to read, so some recommend underlining to really emphasize certain words and phrases.

Some Things to Remember

  • We do not italicize parts of larger works. For example, chapters in a book, poems, sections of newspapers, songs in a CD. Instead we use quotation marks (We heard the song "Billie Jean" by Michael Jackson on the radio three times last night).
  • We also do not italicize religious books (for example, the Bible, Koran, the Torah)
  • Italicize (or underline) punctuation marks that are a part of a tile (?, !)- Getting the Job You Want Now! Getting the Job You Want Now!
  • Do not use italics and underline at the same time (It only cost five dollars.)

Additional Resources

  • To get some practice using italics and underlining take Empire State College's quiz
  • ESC Online Writing Center has a good overview of italics and underlining

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When to Italicize

By YourDictionary

When you italicize a word or a phrase, it gets noticed. However, italics (typeface that slants to the right) are a bit understated and do not attract the same attention as say, bold or underline. When to use italics? There are certain style rules to remember. However, italics are popularly used to call attention to certain words in a block of text. When you think about it if all the words looked the same, reading would be a rather boring affair. One thing to remember for any typeface is not to go overboard. If every other word is italics, it loses its effect and becomes less 'special.'

Italics and Underlining

Italics and underlining are like flashers on road signs. They make you take notice. Italics and underlining can be used interchangeably, although usually underlining is used when something is either hand written or typed; if using a computer you can italicize. If you start using italics, don't switch to underlining within the same document.

Italics or underlining are used most often: for titles of longer works: books, magazines, newspapers, films, TV shows, a complete symphony, plays, long poems, albums:

Albert Borgmann's book, Crossing the Postmodern Divide

the TV show Frasier

the film It Happened One Night

the magazine Adirondack Life

the Beatles album Abbey Road

Italics or underlining are also used for titles of paintings, sculptures, ships, trains, aircraft, and spacecraft:

Van Gogh's painting Starry Night

Daniel Chester French's sculpture The Spirit of Life

U.S.S. Saratoga

Apollo 13

Microsoft Word

Tip: Shorter works, such a book chapters, articles, sections of newspapers, short stories, poems, songs, and TV episodes are placed in quotation marks.

Neither italics nor quotation marks are used with titles of major religious texts, books of the Bible, or classic legal documents:

the Bible Pentateuch the Koran the Declaration of Independence

Use italics or underlining when using words from another language:

Yggdrasil avatar Yahweh sabra

Tip: Many foreign words have become absorbed into our language and should not be italicized or underlined. When in doubt, consult the dictionary. Also, common Latin abbreviations should not be italicized or underlined:

etc. i.e. p.s. viz.

Use italics or underlining to emphasize, stress, or clarify a word or letter in a sentence or when using a word as a linguistic symbol rather than for its meaning:

It was the first time I felt appreciated by my children.

I asked you to articulate your findings, not create a flow chart.

He claimed his data to be accurate, but accurate is a word he often interprets loosely. My daughter's report card showed five B's, two B+'s and one glorious A.

Questions or feedback about ESC's Online Writing Center? Contact us at Learning.Support@esc.edu.

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