Ee380 Assignment 1 Solution Group

On the benefits and pitfalls of extending a statically typed language JIT compiler for dynamic scripting languages

Authors: Jose CastanosIBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA
David EdelsohnIBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA
Kazuaki IshizakiIBM Research - Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Priya NagpurkarIBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA
Toshio NakataniIBM Research - Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Takeshi OgasawaraIBM Research - Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Peng WuIBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY, USA
2012 Article
  Bibliometrics
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· Proceeding
OOPSLA '12 Proceedings of the ACM international conference on Object oriented programming systems languages and applications
Pages 195-212

Tucson, Arizona, USA — October 19 - 26, 2012
ACMNew York, NY, USA ©2012
table of contents ISBN: 978-1-4503-1561-6 doi>10.1145/2384616.2384631
· Newsletter
ACM SIGPLAN Notices - OOPSLA '12
Volume 47 Issue 10, October 2012
Pages 195-212
ACMNew York, NY, USA
table of contentsdoi>10.1145/2398857.2384631

compilersincremental compilersinterpreterspythonscripting languages

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E E 100. Introduction to Electrical Engineering

Introduction to analog (DC) and digital electronics. Including electric component descriptions and equations, Ohm's law, Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws, ideal op-amp circuits, Boolean algebra, design of combinational and sequential logic circuits and VHDL or VERILOG.

E E 109. The Engineering of How Things Work

This class provides Integrated Learning Community students with an introduction to various aspects of engineering.

E E 112. Embedded Systems

Introduction to programming through microcontroller-based projects. Extensive practice in writing computer programs to solve engineering problems with microcontrollers, sensors, and other peripheral devices.

E E 161. Computer Aided Problem Solving

Introduction to scientific programming. Extensive practice in writing programs to solve engineering problems. Items covered will include: loops, input and output, functions, decision statements, and pointers. Pre/

E E 162. Digital Circuit Design

Design of combinational logic circuits based on Boolean algebra. Introduction to state machine design. Implementation of digital projects with hardware description language.

E E 200. Linear Algebra, Probability and Statistics Applications

The theory of linear algebra (vectors and matrices) and probability (random variables and random processes) with application to electrical engineering. Computer programming to solve problems in linear algebra and probability.

E E 201. Electric Circuit Analysis

Electric component descriptions and equations. Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws, formulation and solution of RLC network equations using time domain concepts. For nonmajors only. Minimum 2.0 GPA.

E E 212. Introduction to Computer Architecture and Organization

Introduction to computer architecture and performance analysis techniques. Design and optimization of systems such as personal mobile devices and cloud computing systems.

E E 230. AC Circuit Analysis and Introduction to Power Systems

Electric component descriptions and equations; complete solutions of RLC circuits; steady-state analysis of AC circuits; introduction to frequency response techniques; introduction to power systems in the steady-state. May be repeated up to 4 credits. Restricted to: E E majors.

E E 240. Multivariate and Vector Calculus Applications

Vector algebra, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, partial derivatives, multiple integrals. Calculus of vector functions through electrostatic applications. Divergence, gradient, curl, divergence theorem, Stokes’s theorem, Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’s Law, electric field, electric potential. Applications in Matlab.

E E 260. Embedded Systems

Applications of microcontrollers, FPGAs, interfaces and sensors. Introduction to Assembly language programming.

E E 280. DC and AC Circuits

Electric component descriptions and equations; Kirchhoff's voltage and current laws; formulation and solution of network equations for dc circuits; ideal op-amp circuits. Complete solutions of RLC circuits; steady-state analysis of ac circuits, ac power; introduction to frequency response techniques.

E E 300. Cornerstone Design

Application and realization of engineering principles to a guided team-based design project. Formulation and implementation of test procedures, evaluation of alternate solutions and oral and written communication of the design and test results. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Restricted to: E E majors. Restricted to Las Cruces campus only.

E E 310. Engineering Analysis II

Vector algebra, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, partial derivatives, multiple integrals. Calculus of vector functions through electrostatic applications. Divergence, gradient, curl, divergence theorm, Stoke's theorm, Coulomb's Law, Gauss's Law, electric field, electric potential. Application of Matlab. Restricted to: E E majors.

E E 312. Signals and Systems I

Continuous and discrete time signals and systems. Linear, time-invariant systems. Fourier series, continuous and discrete time Fourier transforms. Time and frequency characterization of signals and systems. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

E E 314. Signals and Systems II

Introduction to communication systems including amplitude, frequency, and pulse-amplitude modulation. Introduction to control systems including linear feedback systems, root-locus analysis, Nyquist criterion. Introduction to digital signal processing including sampling, digital filtering, and spectral analysis. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

E E 330. Environmental Management Seminar I

Survey of practical and new developments in hazardous and radio-active waste management provided through a series of guest lectures and reports of ongoing research. Restricted to: Main campus only. Crosslisted with: C E 330, G EN 330, I E 330, M E 330, WERC 330, A EN 330 and CH E 330

E E 351. Fields and Waves

Static electromagnetic field. Maxwell's equation and time-varying electromagnetic fields. Generalized plane wave propagation, reflection, transmission, superposition and polarization. Transmission line theory. Extensions to optical wave propagation. Applications including Time Domain Reflectrometry (TDR) and fiber optic transmission. Laboratory experience with RF/microwave test equipment and optical apparatus. Restricted to Majors: Electrical Engineering.

E E 363. Computer Systems Architecture

Concepts of modern computer architecture. Processor micro-architectures, hardwired vs. micro-programmed control, pipelining and pipeline hazards, memory hierarchies, bus-based system architecture and memory mapping, hardware-software interface, and operating system concepts. Comparison of architectures to illustrate concepts of computer organization; relationships between architectural and software features.

E E 380. Semiconductor Devices and Electronics

Analysis and design of opamp circuits, diode circuits and single-transistor MOS and BJT amplifiers. Introduction to solid-slate semiconductor devices. Restricted to Majors: Electrical Engineering.

E E 391. Introduction to Electric Power Engineering

Introduction to the principles, concepts, and analysis of the major components of an electric power system. Basic electromechanics, energy conversion and source conversion, transformers, transmission lines, rectifiers, regulators, and system analysis.

E E 395. Introduction to Digital Signal Processing

Undergraduate treatment of sampling/reconstruction, quantization, discrete-time systems, digital filtering, Z-transforms, transfer functions, digital filter realizations, discrete Fourier transform (DFT) and fast Fourier transform (FFT), finite impulse response (FIR) and infinite impulse response (IIR) filter design, and digital signal processing (DSP) applications.

E E 400. Undergraduate Research

Directed undergraduate research. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

E E 402. Capstone Design

Application and realization of engineering principles to a significant team-based design project with significant student managment and autonomy. Determination of performance requirements, including safety, economics, ethics and manufacturability; extensive communication of design choices and tes results to broad audiences; and interfacing of design with other hardware and software. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Restricted to: E E majors.

E E 418. Capstone Design I

Application of engineering principles to a significant design project. Includes teamwork, written and oral communications, and realistic technical, economic, and public safety requirements.

E E 419. Capstone Design II

Realization of design project from E E 418 within time and budget constraints.

E E 425. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

Energy bands, carriers in semiconductors, junctions, transistors, and optoelectronic devices, including light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Taught with E E 525.

E E 426. Introduction to Smart Grid

The course will serve as an introduction to the technologies and design strategies associated with the Smart Grid. The emphasis will be on the development of communications, energy delivery, coordination mechanisms, and management tools to monitor transmission and distribution networks. Taught with E E 546. Crosslisted with: C S 494.

E E 431. Power Systems II

Analysis of a power system in the steady-state. Includes the development of models and analysis procedures for major power system components and for power networks.

E E 432. Power Electronics

Basic principles of power electronics and its applications to power supplies, electric machine control, and power systems.

E E 438. Mobile Application Development

Introduction to mobile application development. Students will develop applications for iOS devices including iPhone and iPad. Topics include object-oriented programming using the Objective-C language, model-view-controller (MVC) pattern, memory management, view controllers, graphical user interface design, callbacks, and web services.

E E 443. Mobile Application Development

Introduction to mobile application development. Students will develop applications for iOS devices including iPhone and iPad. Topics include object-oriented programming using Swift, model-view-controller (MVC) pattern, view controllers including tables and navigation, graphical user interface (GUI) design, data persistence, GPS and mapping, camera, and cloud and web services. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

E E 446. Digital Image Processing

Two-dimensional transform theory, color images, image enhancement, restoration, segmentation, compression and understanding. Taught with E E 596. Prerequisite(s): E E 395

E E 447. Neural Signal Processing

Cross-disciplinary course focused on the acquisition and processing of neural signals. Students in this class will be learn about basic brain structure, different brain signal acquisition techniques (fMRI, EEG, MEG, etc.), neural modeling, and EEG signal processing. To perform EEG signal processing, students will learn and use Matlab along with an EEG analysis package that sits on top of Matlab. Taught with E E 597.

E E 449. Smart Antennas

Smart antenna and adaptive array concepts and fundamentals, uniform and plannar arrays, optimum array processing. Adaptive beamforming algorithms and architectures: gradient-based algorithms, sample matrix inversion, least mean square, recursive mean square, sidlobes cancellers, direction of arrival estimations, effects of mutual coupling and its mitigation. Taught with E E 549.

E E 452. Introduction to Radar

Basic concepts of radar. Radar equation; detection theory. AM, FM, and CW radars. Analysis of tracking, search, MTI, and imaging radar. Taught with E E 548. Restricted to undergraduate students. Pre/

E E 453. Microwave Engineering

Techniques for microwave measurements and communication system design, including transmissions lines, waveguides, and components. Microwave network analysis and active device design. Taught with E E 521. Restricted to undergraduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 454. Antennas and Radiation

Basic antenna analysis and design. Fundamental antenna concepts and radiation integrals. Study of wire antennas, aperture antennas, arrays, reflectors, and broadband antennas. Taught with E E 541. Restricted to undergraduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 460. Space System Mission Design and Analysis

Satellite system design, including development, fabrication, launch, and operations. A systems engineering approach to concepts, methodologies, models, and tools for space systems.

E E 461. Systems Engineering and Program Management

Modern technical management of complex systems using satellites as models. Team projects demonstrate systems engineering disciplines required to configure satellite components.

E E 469. Communications Networks

Introduction to the design and performance analysis of communications networks with major emphasis on the Internet and different types of wireless networks. Covers network architectures, protocols, standards and technologies; design and implementation of networks; networks applications for data, audio and video; performance analysis. Taught with E E 569.

E E 473. Introduction to Optics

The nature of light, geometrical optics, basic optical instruments, wave optics, aberrations, polarization, and diffraction. Elements of optical radiometry, lasers and fiber optics. Crosslisted with: PHYS 473

E E 475. Automatic Control Systems

Design and synthesis of control systems using state variable and frequency domain techniques. Compensation, optimization, multi-variable system design techniques.

E E 476. Computer Control Systems

Representation, analysis and design of discrete-time systems using time-domain and z-domain techniques. Microprocessor control systems.

E E 478. Fundamentals of Photonics

Ray, wave and guided optics, lasers and thermal sources, radiometry, photon detection and signal-to-noise ratio. Elements of photonic crystals, polarization, acousto-optics, electro-optics, and optical nanostructures. Taught with E E 528. Recommended foundation: E E/PHYS 473. Crosslisted with: PHYS 478.

E E 479. Lasers and Applications

Laser operating principles, characteristics, construction and applications. Beam propagation in free space and fibers. Laser diode construction and characteristics. Hands-on laboratory. Taught with E E 529. Crosslisted with: PHYS 479

E E 480. Introduction to Analog and Digital VLSI

Introduction to analog and digital VLSI circuits implemented in CMOS technology. Design of differential amplifiers, opamps, CMOS logic, flip-flops, and adders. Introduction to VLSI fabrication and CAD tools. Crosslisted with: E E 510.

E E 482. Electronics II

Feedback analysis, application of operational amplifiers, introduction to data converters, analog filters, oscillator circuits..

E E 485. Analog VLSI Design

Analysis, design, simulation, layout and verification of CMOS analog building blocks, including references, opamps, switches and comparators. Teams implement a complex analog IC. Taught with E E 523. Restricted to undergraduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 486. Digital VLSI Design

An introduction to VLSI layers. Static and dynamic logic design, memory circuits, arithmetic operators, and digital phase-locked loops. Taught with E E 524. Restricted to undergraduate students.

E E 486 L. Digital VLSI Design Laboratory

Simulation, schematic capture, layout, and verification using software tools of material presented in E E 486. An introduction to measurement of digital VLSI circuits. Taught with E E 524L. Pre/

E E 490. Selected Topics

May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Graduate students may not use credits of E E 490 toward an M.S. or Ph.D. in electrical engineering.

E E 493. Power Systems III

Analysis of a power system under abnormal operating conditions. Topics include symmetrical three-phase faults, theory of symmetrical components, unsymmetrical faults, system protection, and power system stability. Taught with E E 543. Restricted to undergraduate students. Pre/

E E 496. Introduction to Communication Systems

Introduction to the analysis of signals in the frequency and time domains. A study of baseband digital transmission systems and digital/analog RF transmission systems. Introduction to telecom systems as well as satellite systems.

E E 497. Digital Communication Systems I

Techniques for transmitting digital data over commercial networks. Topics include baseband and bandpass data transmission and synchronization techniques. Taught with E E 581. Recommended foundation: E E 496.

E E 501. Research Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Ethics and methods of engineering research; contemporary research topics in electrical and computer engineering.

E E 510. Introduction to Analog and Digital VLSI

Introduction to analog and digital VLSI circuits implemented in CMOS technology. Design of differential amplifiers, opamps, CMOS logic, flip-flops, and adders. Introduction to VLSI fabrication and CAD tools. Recommended preparation is E E 260 and E E 380 or equivalent. Taught with E E 480 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Crosslisted with: E E 480.

E E 512. ASIC Design

This course provides students with experiential knowledge of modern application specific integrated circuits. Topics include ASIC packaging and testing, I/O pads and ESD, Verilog programming and simulation, FPGA verification, Register-transfer level synthesis, timing and area optimization, floorplanning and routing, digital interfaces, full custom and standard cell design, post-layout simulation, and PCB schematics and layout.

E E 514. Biosensor Electronics

Course provides students with knowledge of basic integrated analog and RF blocks and how to combine these circuits into sensory systems for biomedical applications. Target areas are in physiology, brain-machine interfaces, neural recording and stimulation. Lecture includes details on amplifiers, current-mode circuits, A/D converters, low-power radio transmitters and receivers, and simulation and layout of VLSI circuits. Lectures are in the form of recent paper reviews and discussion. Includes teamwork, written and oral communication, and realistic technical requirements. Pre/

E E 515. Electromagnetic Theory I

Electromagnetic theory of time-harmonic fields in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates with applications to guided waves and radiated waves. Induction and equivalence theorems, perturbational and variational principles applied to engineering problems in electromagnetics. Recommended preparation is E E 351 or equivalent. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 516. Electromagnetic Theory II

Continuation of E E 515.

E E 518. Integrated Power Management Circuits

Design and analysis of power management integrated circuits, including linear voltage regulators, voltage references, buck, boost, and buck-boost DC-DC converters, and charge pumps. Extensive use of CAD tools are used to simulate these circuits. Pre/

E E 519. RF Microelectronics

Knowledge of modern Radio Frequency CMOS integrated circuits, Basic Concepts in RF Design, Communication Concepts, Transceiver Architectures, Low Noise Amplifiers, Mixers, Passive Device in RF Designs, Oscillators, Phase-Locked Loops, Frequency Synthesizers, Power Amplifiers, and State-of-the-art RF systems and applications.

E E 520. A/D and D/A Converter Design

Practical design of integrated data converters in CMOS/BJT technologies, OP-AMPS, comparators, sample and holds, MOS switches, element mismatches. Nyquist rate converter architectures: flash, successive approximation, charge redistribution, algorithmic, two step, folding, interpolating, pipelined, delta-sigma converters. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 521. Microwave Engineering

Techniques for microwave measurements and communication system design, including transmission lines, waveguides, and components. Microwave network analysis and active device design. Recommended preparation is E E 351 or equivalent. Taught with E E 453 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 522. Advanced Analog VLSI Design

Design of high-peformance operational amplifiers; class-AB, rail-to-rail, low-voltage, high-bandwidth, fully-differential. Design of linear operational transconductance amplifiers, high-frequency integrated filters, four-quadrant multipliers, and switched-capacitor circuits.

E E 523. Analog VLSI Design

Analysis, design, simulation, layout and verification of CMOS analog building blocks, including references, opamps, switches and comparators. Teams implement a complex analog IC. Recommended preparation is E E 312 and E E 480 or equivalent. Taught with E E 485 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 524. Digital VLSI Design

An introduction to VLSI layers. Static and dynamic logic design, memory circuits, arithmetic operators,and digital phase-locked loops. Taught with E E 486 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Recommended foundation: E E 260 and E E 380.

E E 524 L. Digital VLSI Design Laboratory

Simulation, schematic capture, layout, and verification using software tools of material presented in E E 524. An introduction to measurement of digital VLSI circuits. Taught with E E 486L with differentiated assignments for graduate students.

E E 525. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

Energy bands, carriers in semiconductors, junctions, transistors, and optoelectronic devices, including light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Recommended preparation is E E 380 and E E 351. Taught with: E E 425 with differentiated assignments for graduate students.

E E 528. Fundamentals of Photonics

Ray, wave and guided optics, lasers and thermal sources, radiometry, photon detection and signal-to-noise ratio. Elements of photonic crystals, polarization, acousto-optics, electro-optics, and optical nanostructures. Taught with E E 478 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Recommended foundation: (PHYS 216 or PHYS 217) and E E/PHYS 473. Crosslisted with: PHYS 528.

E E 529. Lasers and Applications

Laser operating principles, characteristics, construction and applications. Beam propagation in free space and fibers. Laser diode construction and characteristics. Hands-on laboratory. Recommended foundation: E E 351 or PHYS 461. Taught with: E E 479 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Crosslisted with: PHYS 529

E E 530. Environmental Management Seminar I

Same as CH E 530, C E 530, I E 530.

E E 531. Power System Modeling and Computational Methods

Development and analysis of fast computational methods for efficient solution of large scale power-system problems. Algorithms for constructing the bus impedance matrix; sparse matrix techniques; partial- inverse methods; compensation of mutual coupling. Pre/ Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 532. Dynamics of Power Systems

Transient and dynamic stability of power systems; synchronous machine modeling and dynamics; prediction and stabilization of system oscillations. Recommended preparation is E E 493 or equivalent. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 533. Power System Operation

AGC, economic dispatch, unit commitment, operations planning, power flow analysis and network control, system control centers. Recommended preparation is E E 493 or equivalent. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 534. Power System Relaying

Fundamental relay operating principles and characteristics. Current, voltage, directional, differential relays; distance relays; pilot relaying schemes. Standard protective schemes for system protection. Operating principles and overview of digital relays. Recommended preparation is E E 493 or equivalent.

E E 537. Power Electronics

Basic principles of power electronics and its applications to power supplies, electric machine control, and power systems. Recommended preparation is E E 314, E E 380, and E E 391. Taught with E E 432 with differentiated assignments for graduate students.

E E 541. Antennas and Radiation

Basic antenna analysis and design. Fundamental antenna concepts and radiation integrals. Study of wire antennas, aperture antennas, arrays, reflectors, and broadband antennas. Recommended preparation is E E 351 or equivalent. Taught with E E 454 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 542. Power Systems II

Analysis of a power system in the steady-state. Includes the development of models and analysis procedures for major power system components and for power networks. Recommended preparation is E E 391 or equivalent. Taught with E E 431 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 543. Power Systems III

Analysis of a power system under abnormal operating conditions. Topics include symmetrical three-phase faults, theory of symmetrical components, unsymmetrical faults, system protection, and power system stability. Recommended preparation is E E 431 or equivalent. Taught with E E 493 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 544. Distribution Systems

Concepts and techniques associated with the design and operation of electrical distribution systems. Recommended preparation is E E 542 and E E 543. Taught with E E 494 with differentiated assignments for graduate students.

E E 545. Digital Signal Processing II

Non-ideal sampling and reconstruction, oversampling and noise shaping in A/D and D/A, finite word length effects, random signals, spectral analysis, multirate filter banks and wavelets, and applications. Recommended preparation is E E 395 or equivalent. Restricted to: Main campus only.

E E 546. Introduction to Smart Grid

The course will serve as an introduction to the technologies and design strategies associated with the Smart Grid. The emphasis will be on the development of communications, energy delivery, coordination mechanisms, and management tools to monitor transmission and distribution networks. Taught with E E 426. Crosslisted with: C S 514.

E E 548. Introduction to Radar

Basic concepts of radar. Radar equation; detection theory, AM, FM, and CW radars. Analysis of tracking, search, MTI, and image radar. Recommended preparation is E E 310, E E 351, and E E 496 or equivalent. Taught with E E 452 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Restricted to: Main campus only.

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